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History of the Citizen

Set in the beautiful surroundings of the completely restored grade A1 listed The Citizen bar and dining rooms in located on 24 St Vincent Place, Glasgow. Founded in 1842, The Evening Citizen was one of the first evening Newspapers in Glasgow. In 1889 their new offices opened in St. Vincent Place in Scotland’s first Red Sandstone building. The Citizen Bar and Dining Rooms will pay tribute to the glory days of the Evening Citizen newspaper as well as celebrating Glasgow’s past, present and future. The Evening Citizen, was an evening version of the Glasgow Citizen (a daily newspaper founded in 1842). It was first published in August 1864, was one of the first of three evening newspapers to be printed, published and sold in the Glasgow area.

Both papers were founded by James Hedderwick, a University of London dropout, it became one of Glasgow’s most successful papers. In fact, it was so successful that an evening edition of the paper was founded in 1864. Hedderwick’s success allowed him to move on to establishing other evening newspapers throughout the UK, most notably the London Echo. The Citizen comprised of a daily edition, an evening edition and a weekly supplement. In 1881, Hedderwick was granted an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow. In 1889 the paper’s publishing offices moved to 24 St. Vincent Place in a purpose built. The building was also one of the first buildings in the city to be fully electric.

Founded in 1842

Founded in 1842, The Evening Citizen was one of the first evening Newspapers in Glasgow. In 1889 their new offices opened in St. Vincent Place in Scotland’s first Red Sandstone building. This beautiful Grade A listed building has been restored and The Citizen Bar and Dining Rooms will pay tribute to the glory days of the Evening Citizen newspaper as well as celebrating Glasgow’s past, present and future.

Bought Over In 1897

Following Hedderwick’s death in 1897 and the paper’s purchase by Beaverbrook Newspapers Ltd. (The Daily Express), the paper moved from a daily and evening paper, to an evening only. This changed during World War II when it ran daily editions again to keep up with the constant news coming in from the continent.

Final Edition 1974

They would eventually move to offices on Albion Street where They printed right up until their final edition on Friday 29 March 1974